Archive for April 2017

How Nature Documentaries Are Fake

“Because storytelling is what engages us, not facts and figures”

U.S. iPhone Ownership Reaches All-Time High on Strength of iPhone 7 

There are still nearly 50 million iPhone 6 users, in addition to the more than 20 million iPhone owners who have a 5 model or earlier. These 70 million collectively represent a huge base of users who are ripe for an upgrade cycle later this year when the iPhone 8 is expected to be released.

Source: U.S. iPhone Ownership Reaches All-Time High on Strength of iPhone 7 – comScore, Inc

More isn’t always better

It’s very difficult to measure networks’ performance, in part because they are so complex, but also because people use them differently at different times, and because those choices affect others’ experiences. For example, one person choosing to drive to work instead of taking the bus puts one more car on the road, which might get involved in a crash or otherwise contribute to a traffic jam.

Explaining the Braess paradox.

In 1968, German mathematician Dietrich Braess observed the possibility that adding a road to an area with congested traffic could actually make things worse, not better. This paradox can occur when travel times depend on the amount of traffic. If too many drivers decide their own optimal route involves one particular road, that road can become congested, slowing everyone’s travel time. In effect, the drivers would have been better off if the road hadn’t been built.

This phenomenon has been found not only in transportation networks and the internet, but also, recently, in electrical circuits.

We shouldn’t waste time and money building or repairing network links the community would be better without. But how can we tell which elements help and which make things worse?

Source: Calculating where America should invest in its transportation and communications networks

There is no ‘the industry’

It’s easy to say that, “the industry is to blame,” or “the industry doesn’t understand this.”But because no one is charge, because there’s no coherent enforcement method, this is merely a shorthand. There is no industry, no economy, no market. Only people.And people, people can take action if they care.

Source: Seth’s Blog: There is no ‘the industry’

or the Government, or the Media, or the News… still all just people

Better Than Free

When copies are free, you need to sell things which can not be copied.

Well, what can’t be copied?

  • Immediacy
  • Personalization
  • Interpretation
  • Authenticity
  • Accessibility
  • Embodiment
  • Patronage
  • Findability

Source: The Technium: Better Than Free

Interstellar is almost here

Many Android Phones Vulnerable to Attacks Over Malicious Wi-Fi Networks

The vulnerability resides in a widely used Wi-Fi chipset manufactured by Broadcom and used in both iOS and Android devices. Apple patched the vulnerability with Monday’s release of iOS 10.3.1. “An attacker within range may be able to execute arbitrary code on the Wi-Fi chip,” Apple’s accompanying advisory warned. In a highly detailed blog post published Tuesday, the Google Project Zero researcher who discovered the flaw said it allowed the execution of malicious code on a fully updated 6P “by Wi-Fi proximity alone, requiring no user interaction.”

Google is in the process of releasing an update in its April security bulletin. The fix is available only to a select number of device models, and even then it can take two weeks or more to be available as an over-the-air update to those who are eligible. Company representatives didn’t respond to an e-mail seeking comment for this post.

The proof-of-concept exploit developed by Project Zero researcher Gal Beniamini uses Wi-Fi frames that contain irregular values. The values, in turn, cause the firmware running on Broadcom’s wireless system-on-chip to overflow its stack. By using the frames to target timers responsible for carrying out regularly occurring events such as performing scans for adjacent networks, Beniamini managed to overwrite specific regions of device memory with arbitrary shellcode. Beniamini’s code does nothing more than write a benign value to a specific memory address. Attackers could obviously exploit the same series of flaws to surreptitiously execute malicious code on vulnerable devices within range of a rogue access point.

Source: Many Android Phones Vulnerable to Attacks Over Malicious Wi-Fi Networks – Schneier on Security