Archive for September 2017

Misunderstanding the point of Face ID

It is ironic that, at the same time as people are railing against the low security of Face ID, the iPhone is also being criticized for being the phone of choice among sexual predators because it’s so secure. They have achieved a positively Schr?dinger-like level of security.

From On the face of it: Misunderstanding the point of Face ID

Choose a License

For reference, all licenses described in the choosealicense.com repository, in a table.

Source: Appendix | Choose a License

ugh feeds… and validators…

Is anyone else sick and tired of the so-called feed validator changing its mind on fundamental issues every other week? I’m sure Sam Ruby and whoever else is still working on the Validator mean well, but the constant ivory tower decisions to change the way it interpets “valid RSS 2.0” is making it seem more like a political advocacy tool than anything else. Perhaps I should give the benefit of the doubt and “Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.”

Source: The Feed Validator is Dead to Me | Matt Mullenweg

i’m sure they mean well but

src

Designing Websites for iPhone X | WebKit

The first new feature is an extension to the existing viewport meta tag called viewport-fit, which provides control over the insetting behavior. viewport-fit is available in iOS 11.

The next step towards making our page usable again after adopting viewport-fit=cover is to selectively apply padding to elements that contain important content, in order to ensure that they are not obscured by the shape of the screen.

@supports(padding: max(0px)) {
    .post {
        padding-left: max(12px, constant(safe-area-inset-left));
        padding-right: max(12px, constant(safe-area-inset-right));
    }
}

Experienced web developers might have previously encountered the “CSS locks” mechanism, commonly used to clamp CSS properties to a particular range of values. Using min() and max() together makes this much easier, and will be very helpful in implementing effective responsive designs in the future.

Source: Designing Websites for iPhone X | WebKit

some changes to get maximum support here for sure

How Apple Built An iPhone Camera That Makes Everyone A Professional Photographer

“If you look at the Dutch Masters and compare them to the paintings that were being done in Asia, stylistically they’re different,” Johnnie Manzari, a designer on Apple’s Human Interface Team, says. “So we asked why are they different? And what elements of those styles can we recreate with software?”

And then Apple went into the studio and attempted to do just that. “We spent a lot of time shining light on people and moving them around — a lot of time,” Manzari says. “We had some engineers trying to understand the contours of a face and how we could apply lighting to them through software, and we had other silicon engineers just working to make the process super-fast. We really did a lot of work.”

“There’s the Augmented Reality team, saying, ‘Hey, we need more from the camera because we want to make AR a better experience and the camera plays a role in that,'” Schiller says. “And the team that’s creating Face ID, they need camera technology and hardware, software, sensors, and lenses to support on-device biometric identification. And so there are many roles the camera plays, either as a primary thing — to take a picture — or as a support thing, to help unlock your phone or enable an AR experience. And so there’s a great deal of work between all the teams and all of these elements.”

Source: How Apple Built An iPhone Camera That Makes Everyone A Professional Photographer

Original Apple Watch Doesn’t Support watchOS 4 Heart Rate Features

If you’re planning on using the new heart rate monitoring features in watchOS 4 on your original Apple Watch think again because they aren’t there. Apple Watch Series 0, as it’s now called, can track your heart rate, but the new monitoring options require an Apple Watch Series 1 or newer.

Apple Watch heart rate monitoring features in watchOS 4

watchOS 4 heart rate monitoring features require Apple Watch Series 1 or newer

If you have the original Apple Watch (introduced in April 2015 and discontinued in September 2016) you can’t take advantage of heart rate notifications and resting heart rate tracking. Apple hasn’t said why, so we can only speculate is has something to do with the Apple S1 processor used in the original model.

Source: Original Apple Watch Doesn’t Support watchOS 4 Heart Rate Features – The Mac Observer

Apple Watch Series 3 vs Series 2 vs Series 1 vs Apple Watch (2015): What’s the difference?

  • Original (2015) and Series 1: Splash proof, composite back, 450nits OLED Retina display, Ion-X glass for screen protection
  • Series 2 and Series 3 (GPS): Waterproof, composite back, 1000nits OLED Retina display, Ion-X glass for screen protection or sapphire on stainless steel and ceramic models
  • Series 3 (GPS & Cellular): Waterproof, ceramic back, 1000nits OLED Retina display, Ion-X glass for screen protection on aluminium or sapphire on stainless steel and ceramic models Same rectangular design across all models, all straps compatible
  • Series 1: Standard Apple Watch model in aluminium with Sport Band
  • Series 3 (GPS only): Standard Apple Watch model or Nike+ model
  • Series 3 (GPS & Cellular): Standard model in aluminium or stainless steel, Nike+ model, Hermès model, Edition model
  • 38mm and 42mm size options
  • Original (2015): S1 processor, HR, accelerometer, gyroscope, ambient light sensor, splashproof
  • Series 1: S1P processor, HR, accelerometer, gyroscope, ambient light sensor, 8GB capacity, splashproof
  • Series 2: S2 processor, HR, accelerometer, gyroscope, ambient light sensor, built-in GPS 8GB capacity, waterproof
  • Series 3 (GPS): S3 processor, W2 wireless chip, HR, accelerometer, gyroscope, barometric altimeter, ambient light sensor, built-in GPS, 8GB capacity, waterproof, Siri speaks
  • Series 3 (GPS & Cellular): S3 processor, W2 wireless chip, HR, accelerometer, gyroscope, barometric altimeter, ambient light sensor, built-in GPS, 16GB capacity, waterproof, LTE connectivity, Siri speaks

Source: Apple Watch Series 3 vs Series 2 vs Series 1 vs Apple Watch (2015): What’s the difference? – Pocket-lint