Archive for November 2017

Linux Now Powers 100% of the World’s Top 500 Supercomputers

 

Linux has long dominated the TOP500 list, powering the majority of the machines that make it. At last count, back in June, 99.6% (or 498) of the top 500 fastest supercomputers ran Linux,

But as of November 2017 that figure stands at a full 100%: the 500 most powerful supercomputers in the world now use Linux.

The majority of these machines aren’t running your average off-the-torrent desktop distribution, but a bespoke, highly customised, and specialised version of Linux. But a minority do run something more familiar:

  • 5 supercomputers run Ubuntu
  • 20 supercomputers run some form of RedHat Enterprise Linux (RHEL)
  • 109 supercomputers run the RedHat affiliated CentOS

The world’s (current) fastest supercomputer is China’s Sunway TaihuLight, which is powered by a colossal 650,000+ CPUs. This beast of a machine, which runs a customised version of Linux called ‘Sunway RaiseOS’, has a processing speed of 93 petaflops — or the equivalent power of 2 million laptops working in unison.

 

Source: Linux Now Powers 100% of the World’s Top 500 Supercomputers – OMG! Ubuntu!

Face ID’s Innovation: Continuous Authentication

I believe Face ID is slower at actual recognition than Touch ID, but it’s nearly impossible to notice due to the implementation. In the time it takes to move your finger to the Touch ID sensor, Face ID could have already unlocked your iPhone.

That’s the real Face ID revolution. Since you’re almost always looking at your phone while you’re using it, Face ID enables what I call “continuous authentication.”

Source: Face ID’s Innovation: Continuous Authentication – TidBITS

A closer look at the capabilities and risks of iPhone X face mapping

In clause 5.1.2 (iii) of the developer guidelines, Apple writes:

Data gathered from the HomeKit API or from depth and/or facial mapping tools (e.g. ARKit, Camera APIs, or Photo APIs) may not be used for advertising or other use-based data mining, including by third parties.

It also forbids developers from using the iPhone X’s depth sensing module to try to create user profiles for the purpose of identifying and tracking anonymous users of the phone — writing in 5.1.2 (i):

You may not attempt, facilitate, or encourage others to identify anonymous users or reconstruct user profiles based on data collected from depth and/or facial mapping tools (e.g. ARKit, Camera APIs, or Photo APIs), or data that you say has been collected in an “anonymized,” “aggregated,” or otherwise non-identifiable way.

While another clause (2.5.13) in the policy requires developers not to use the TrueDepth camera system’s facial mapping capabilities for account authentication purposes.

Rather developers are required to stick to using the dedicated API Apple provides for interfacing with Face ID (and/or other iOS authentication mechanisms). So basically, devs can’t use the iPhone X’s sensor hardware to try and build their own version of ‘Face ID’ and deploy it on the iPhone X (as you’d expect).

They’re also barred from letting kids younger than 13 authenticate using facial recognition.

Apps using facial recognition for account authentication must use LocalAuthentication (and not ARKit or other facial recognition technology), and must use an alternate authentication method for users under 13 years old.

Source: A closer look at the capabilities and risks of iPhone X face mapping | TechCrunch