The magic / boilerplate trade-off

Phil Webb had an insightful tweet the other day.

Programming environments oscillate between boilerplate and magic. APIs tend to start out with all the wires exposed. Programming is tedious, but nothing is hidden. Development is hard, but debugging is easy. See, for example, the hello-world program for Win32.

Programmers get tired of this, and create levels of abstraction. Boilerplate is reduced and development gets easier. And if the abstraction is done well, debugging doesn’t get harder, or not much harder. But this abstraction doesn’t go far enough. Programmers feel like things should be easier still. That’s when magic comes in. Magic differs from abstraction in that it not only hides details, it’s actively misleading. Something appears to work one way, the desired way, but something quite different is going on. Development gets easier, but debugging gets much harder. If the magic gets to be too much, developers look to start over with something more transparent, and the cycle begins again.

The magic / boilerplate trade-off

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