What’s wrong with your website?

Not much.

In real life, it’s not unusual for one in four people who walk into your store to buy from you. Not unusual for every friend you call on the phone to have an actual conversation with you. Not surprising that most people you ask on a date say yes, or at least politely decline.

In direct mail, you’re doing well if only 99 people out of a hundred say no. Not 25%, but 1% success.

Online, though, the numbers are far worse. It’s not unusual for a thousand people to visit your website before someone buys something. It’s not news if you ask 5,000 Twitter followers to do something and they all refuse to take action.

Too much noise, too many choices, and most of all, too many people asking for everything, all the time.

People won’t click all the things they can click, ever. They won’t get three or four or nine clicks into your site no matter how responsive, webkitted and user tested your site is.

Sure, you can probably make it better.

Someone who’s really good at it can probably make it measurably better.

But don’t beat yourself up that it’s not converting. By real-life definitions, nothing online converts.

The secret is maximizing the things that can’t work in real life. The viral effects, the upside of remarkable products and services, the horizontal movement of ideas, from person to person, not from you to the market.

via Seth’s Blog: What’s wrong with your website?.

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